Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Saturday, 4 November 2017

6×6 Art Show and Auction at Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum

6x6

“Join us for our annual 6×6 Art Show and Auction Nov. 4th. Over 60 art objects produced by some of the region’s most talented artists will be auctioned, with the silent auction running from 5-8pm and the live auction starting at 6pm. Tickets are $15.00. Fifty raffle tickets are available for $20 each. The winner can pick any 6×6 prior to the Auction event!”

This is one of the three most fun official events on Ilwaco’s yearly calendar (the other two being the Slow Drag and the Crab Pot Christmas Tree).  It is my favourite of the events because of the winning combo of good food, good art,  the hilarity of Bruce Peterson’s auctioneering, and the annual battle for the sock monkey art.

We first perused the four tables of silent auction items.

DSC04633.JPG

DSC04635.JPG

DSC04636.JPG

DSC05513.jpg

We had a look at the live auction display case…

DSC04637.JPG

just a few of the live auction items

…and then filled our plates from the delicious buffet, created by the 2 Monkeys (Rosemary and Ellen, two museum staffers who cater the museum events).

DSC04639.JPG

DSC04646.JPG

DSC04643.jpg

DSC04644

The skewers formed a peace sign.

DSC04645.JPG

The clam fritters and tri tip sliders were especially tasty.

DSC04642

DSC04641

DSC04640.JPG

desserts

DSC05368.jpg

delicious morsels and auction paddles

DSC05473.jpg

at the bar

DSC04652.JPG

a full house

DSC04653.JPG

Esteemed local Kaye Mulvey picked the raffle ticket, here held by museum director Betsy Millard.

All of the raffle tickets had been sold, providing a good fundraising for the museum. The winner of the raffle gets to pick any item of art.  The winner picked this piece, “an homage to a 60s female band called the Murmaids”:

murmaids.jpg

Auctioneer Bruce Peterson presents the art with witty patter.

DSC05391.jpg

He began with the rules of the evening:

DSC05387.jpg

Security Chief Richard Schroeder stands stoic guard over the art.  No sudden moves, please, unless you are one of the two art handlers.

DSC04661.JPG

DSC05389.jpg

DSC04688.JPG

Only the art handlers dare to approach the display easel.

DSC05456.jpg

DSC04694.JPG

Communications Chief Karla LeClaire Nelson, owner of Time Enough Books, handles communication from call in bidders.

DSC05390.jpg

She also has a slight weakness for sock monkeys.

DSC04684.JPG

Bruce briefly explained an important 60s topic, the path to enlightenment.

DSC04663.JPG

what we once though

DSC05392.jpg

the truth

The audience was led in a singalong, demonstrating the depth of meaningful 60s song lyrics.

DSC04666.JPG

DSC05393.jpg

Let the live auction begin!

DSC04668.JPG

Bruce, museum director Betsy Millard, Karla

upupaway

DSC05394.jpgDSC04670.JPG

allineed

DSC05397.jpgDSC04676.JPG

flowersinherhair

Bruce waxed eloquent about “The Trail to Grandma’s Village’ by Charles Funk, an artist of the Chinook Tribe.  The trail led down from Bruceport, near South Bend, to a village that is now gone.  We agree with Bruce that Charles surely still walks the trail in his dreams.

DSC04679.JPG

roadtograndma

DSC05408.jpg

DSC04683

Karla takes another call in bid.

Bruce shared his expertise about the Mr. Boston Bartender’s Guide while auctioning a repurposed book and knitted coasters by Lisa Mattfield.

DSC04689.JPG

bartenders.jpg

The auction includes a few local items of interest as well as art.

DSC04690.JPG

DSC04693.JPG

countryfishes.jpg

DSC04695.JPG

flowerpower.jpg

DSC04696.JPG

We had very much liked what artist Marie Powell had written about her piece, above, when it was on display in the preview show at the museum, about these times echoing the political tumult of the 1960s.

whatsthatsound.jpg

DSC04697.JPG

peace.jpg

DSC05411.jpg

DSC04701.JPG

DSC04706.JPG

DSC04704.JPG

a birding tour and lunch put on by the Willapa Refuge, including a ride in the Willapa Refuge van

As Bruce says, these package tours do require you to have five friends to invite.

In an interlude from art, Bruce asked for donations for an Ethafoam party, not a foam party.  Ethefoam is an expensive product that the museum uses to protect its exhibits in storage.

DSC04707.JPG

DSC04709.JPG

not a foam party

DSC04708

Bruce’s grandson tries to make ethafoam look more fun.

Time for the highlight of the night: The annual bidding war between Karla and her sister, Kathy, for the sock monkey painting.

DSC04711.JPG

arlo.jpg

Across the room, a third bidder appeared!

DSC04713.JPG

DSC04712

DSC04714

Kathy

DSC04715.JPG

Karla

DSC04716.JPG

showdown with the mysterious third bidder

DSC05429.jpg

Third bidder kept swigging from a bottle of booze.

DSC05433.jpg

DSC05435.jpg

Karla prevailed and won the sock monkey painting for $700, to add to her collection of at least 9 others.

DSC05438.jpg

DSC05449.jpg

peaceforall.jpg

DSC05450.jpg

photography by auctioneer Bruce Peterson

summeroflove.jpg

DSC04725.JPG

angel.jpg

Bruce reminded us, with an evocative slide, that metal artist Jacob and his wife, Maddy of Pink Poppy Bakery, had just had a baby.

DSC04738.JPG

DSC04733.JPG

Jacob, Maddy, and their daughter Quincy

DSC05471.jpg

DSC04735

Jacob’s “Steel Angel” did very well at $400.

Security Chief Schroeder maintained his stoic expression and solid stance during the auctioning of his own art piece, a wood turned martini glass with olive.

DSC04739.JPG

glass.jpg

DSC04744.JPG

Has his expression lifted slightly with pleasure when his martini glass sold for $510?

DSC04748.JPG

In the silent auction, one can often win pieces at a price more affordable to the average art collector.

DSC04752.jpg

Rosemary presents the traditional fresh baked shortbread at the end of the show.

DSC04754.JPG

At the end, the live and silent auction pieces are paid for and packaged up.

DSC05535.jpg

We are already looking forward to next year.

Here, courtesy of the museum, are a few more of our favourite pieces from the 2017 auction.  You can see them all here.

cranberry.jpg

waterfall.jpg

resist.jpg

ebony.jpg

surfin.jpg

haight.jpg

3dog.jpg

flowerpower.jpg

64.jpg

Advertisements

Halloween is a very big deal on the flatland streets of Ilwaco.  Decorations began to appear at the end of September.

house

next door to the post office, 9-29

griffin.jpg

Wendi’s Attic, 10-3-17

wendisattic.jpg

terry.jpg

Lake Street front porch, 10-7

post.jpg

Halloween garland going up at the Post Office on Lake Street, 10-13

pirate.jpg

pirate ship, Lake Street, 10-13

house2.jpg

more on Lake Street, 10-14

punkins.jpg

wendi2.jpg

Wendi’s Attic at night, 10-14

js.jpg

Lake Street, 10-14

js2

Lake Street, 10-16

missy

pirate house, 10-16

house3.jpg

Spruce Street, 10-22

detail.jpg

spruce.jpg

spider.jpg

On October 29, councilwoman Vinessa came by distributing Candy Relief, a collection of candy taken up by the Ilwaco Merchants Association for the folks on the main Ilwaco Halloween route.

Tuesday, 31 October 2017

We could not have had better weather for our Ilwaco Halloween extravaganza.  Not only did we have a party at our house, with a group of friends gathered to welcome the trick or treaters, but we did two walkabouts of the town and gathered some photos of the occasion.

DSC04006.JPG

4:40 PM: The first trick or treaters arrive.

The first walkabout took place between 5:30 and 6:30 PM.

DSC04014

pirate house, Lake Street

DSC04015.JPG

Lucy Dagger

DSC04017.JPG

Lucy keeping a tally of trick or treaters

DSC04019.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04020

Lake Street

DSC04021.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04023.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04025.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04025 2.JPG

DSC04028.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04029.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04031.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04033

Spruce Street

DSC04035

Spruce Street

DSC04037.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04041.JPG

sign says “Please Take One!”

DSC04042.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04051.JPG

Ilwaco Volunteer Fire Department

DSC04044.JPG

Fire Chief Tommy Williams

DSC04045.JPG

Tommy agreed fire fighting is hard work

DSC04046.jpg

DSC04048.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04049.JPG

DSC04053.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04055.JPG

Inn at Harbour Village

DSC04057.JPG

Lake Street,  by the post office

We know a few people who gave the music boosters $5.00 for a cider or cocoa.

DSC04060.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04062.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04064.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04068.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04070.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04074.JPG

Spruce Street

DSC04077.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04078.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04080.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04079.JPG

DSC04081.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04093

Lake Street

DSC04083

DSC04098.JPG

Tangly Cottage

DSC04100.JPG

Tangly Cottage

DSC04084.JPG

little chili relleno on Lake Street

DSC04088.JPG

Lake Street

DSC04092.JPG

Lake Street

We garnered some photos from friends:

birds.jpg

photo by Tony Hofer

kids.jpg

photo by Tony Hofer

shark

photo by Tony Hofer

teresa.jpg

photo by Tony Hofer

byazure.jpg

photo courtesy Azure Salon and Spa

zure2.jpg

photo courtesy Azure Salon and Spa

22894502_10155802430119513_3672038299251853269_n.jpg

photo by Wendy Murry

pirate2.jpg

photo by Wendy Murry

lake.jpg

Lake Street, photo by Wendy Murry

bw.jpg

photo by Wendy Murry

Between 7:30 and 8:30, we took another walkabout:

DSC05253

Lake Street

DSC05260

Lake Street

DSC05262.jpg

Lake Street

DSC05264.jpg

DSC05268.jpg

DSC05324.jpg

Spruce Street

DSC05327.jpg

Spruce Street

DSC05331.jpg

Spruce Street

DSC05340.jpg

Colbert House, Lake Street

DSC05337.jpg

Colbert House

dsc05354.jpg

Tangly Cottage

DSC05277.jpg

DSC05280.jpg

Inn at Harbour Village

DSC05283.jpg

Inn at Harbour Village

 Inside the Inn at Harbour Village, a former church turned bed and breakfast inn, the old chapel was transformed into a haunting.

DSC05289

DSC05291.jpg

 

DSC05295.jpgDSC05298.jpgDSC05305.jpg

We had 543 trick or treaters at our Lake Street abode, and the fire station had 703.

Tangly Cottage Gardening Journal

Saturday, 1 July 2017

We took advantage of much of what our town had to offer today.  Earlier in the week, while weeding the port gardens to get them spiffing for today’s events, I had had that feeling of being smitten with love for this little town.  The first Saturday in July is always special here, with probably the biggest Saturday market of the year followed by a fireworks extravaganza at the port in the evening.

Ilwaco Saturday Market

Knowing that the Pink Poppy Bakery booth would be at the market today is part of what drew us down there.  (Baker Maddy is pregnant and therefore not doing every week of market this summer.)

DSC02668.jpg Eryngium ‘Sapphire Blue’ in one of our port gardens (Allan’s photo)

IMG_2720.jpg Allan’s photo

DSC00615.JPG The lines were long at the food booths.

DSC00617.JPG

DSC00620.JPG plants for sale

DSC00621.JPG at one of the plant booths

DSC00622.JPG the cutest booth of all

DSC00623.JPG port…

View original post 443 more words

In our riverside town, Ilwaco visitors and locals can enjoy a long stroll with many opportunities to stop and smell the flowers.

Beginning at the Ilwaco Community Building at 158 First Avenue North, you can check out a gardening book from the Ilwaco Timberland Library.  Then have a look around the parking lot landscaping.  These garden beds feature heather, red twig dogwoods, rhododendrons, ferns, perennials, annual poppies, and a lavish display of spring bulbs.

ICB.jpg

As you walk south down the hill toward the port, look to your left to view a wetland between the Community Building and City Hall.

wetland.jpg

As you continue south, concrete planters and street trees enhance five blocks of First Avenue.

first.jpg

first2.jpg

n.jpg

 A jaunt one block to the east on Lake Street will take you to the Ilwaco Post Office, where an exuberant garden awaits locals picking up their mail.

po.jpg

post.jpg

As you return to First Avenue, have a look at the Discovery Garden of native plants and its Mariners Memorial wall behind the Columbia Pacific Heritage Museum parking lot.

illahee.jpg

mariners.jpg

Mariners Memorial wall

Between Eagle Street and Howerton Way, the two block long garden along the Ilwaco Boatyard’s chain link fence peaks in June and July when the annual poppies bloom.  With an ever changing backdrop of boats, this narrow strip is designed to showcase a collection of drought tolerant and deer resistant plants.  Perennials with winter structure keep it attractive year round.

boatyard.jpg

At the south end of the boatyard garden, you might see a boat being hoisted from the water.

DSC00159 (1).jpg

boatyard1.jpg

Turning the corner onto Howerton Avenue and proceeding east, you will soon come upon seven blocks of curbside gardens designed to be drought, salt and wind tolerant, deer resistant, and low in height to preserve traffic sight lines.  The show begins in February with over 20 different kinds of narcissi (daffodils) and whatever crocuses the gulls have been kind enough to not pull up.  Annual poppies, perennial flowers, low shrubs, and ornamental grasses carry through well into autumn.

salmon.jpg

salt.jpg

The curbside gardens are heavily influenced by the work of two famous gardeners:  Piet Oudolf from Holland and the gravel garden of English gardener Beth Chatto.  The goal of the boatyard and curbside gardens is a walking experience where the most avid plant lover will be excited by the choice of plants, while providing a multitude of flowers to appeal to non gardeners as well.  Each bed has a different character with certain plants repeated to create the feeling of one long, cohesive garden.

east.jpeg

h1.jpg

h2.jpg

A few of the Howerton  businesses have their own gardens tucked next to their buildings.  Salt Hotel and Pub’s courtyard is a green and restful oasis.  Time Enough Books’ garden boat blooms with tulips and cosmos.   A striking metal wall and curved beds adorn the east side of the Loading Dock Village. CoHo Charters and Motel’s landscaping includes clipped escallonias in their curbside bed.

boat.jpg

Time Enough Books offers a good selection of gardening books.

baskets

Port Office, south side, with hanging baskets from Basket Case Greenhouse.

office.jpg

port office garden, Waterfront Way

Come on Saturday from May through September and you’ll find plant vendors, birdhouses, and garden decor at the weekly Saturday market on the waterfront.

market.jpg

(All of these gardens except for the museum’s Discovery Garden are maintained by Tangly Cottage Gardening.)

A few days before Thanksgiving, our annual crab pot tree was assembled with help from the Port of Ilwaco crew.

tree

lifting by crane

lifting by crane

pots

City Hall got decorated, as well.

City Hall got decorated, as well.

After Thanksgiving, Bruce Peterson and a couple of helpers strung the lights on the tree.

ladder

lights

The decorations were hung by the 1st of December…

floats

And the tree lighting festival took place on December 3rd.  It is always held on the first Saturday in December.

We had a late afternoon meal at Salt Pub to ready ourselves for the 5 Pm event.

pub

We were not as sad as we look.

We were not as sad as we look.  We were having a thoughtful moment for a friend who is not well.

our view

our view

the bar at Salt Pub

the bar at Salt Pub

As dusk fell, the restaurant filled and our mood lifted.

As dusk fell, the restaurant filled and our mood lifted.

downstairs window, Salt Hotel

downstairs window, Salt Hotel

We departed into a drizzle to walk one block to the crab pot tree.

Salt Hotel Courtyard

Salt Hotel Courtyard

Two doors east of Salt, Time Enough Books.

Two doors east of Salt, Time Enough Books.

Time Enough Books

Time Enough Books

Salt

Salt

Salt Hotel

Salt Hotel, north side

and south side

and south side

gathering by the tree in increasing rain

gathering by the tree in increasing rain

The suspense is always great on a rainy tree lighting evening.  Bruce had gotten a generator to try to make sure the tree lighting worked.  Last year, during rain and big wind, the lights fizzled out after a short while.

suspense

suspense

success!

success!

The world’s shortest fireworks display briefly seemed as if it would be a non display, as the wet fuse refused to light.  Karla from Time Enough Books was the official fireworks launcher.  And then, another success.

firework

firework2

firework3

It was an extra long display this year of at least three bursts, possibly losing its place as a record breaking tiny fireworks display.

Just one carol was sung because of increasing rain.

Just one carol was sung because of increasing rain.

Our friend Ernie

Our friend Ernie

Hardy beach folk

Hardy beach folk

must be magical

must be magical

We were thanked and given a blessing to go on down to the port shops and restaurants.

We were thanked and given a blessing to go on down to the port shops and restaurants.

tree and lightpole with crab decoration

tree and light pole with crab decoration

walking down to Waterfront Way

walking down to Waterfront Way

Salt Hotel

Salt Hotel

Salt co-owner Layla

Salt co-owner Layla

Salt Hotel lobby

Salt Hotel lobby

inside, stocking for Salt friends and staff

inside, stocking for Salt friends and staff

The Ilwaco High School Jazz Band performed carols in the outdoor patio by Time Enough Books and Purly Shell.

jazz

Ilwaco High School Jazz Band

Ilwaco High School Jazz Band

in Time Enough Books

in Time Enough Books

our local independent bookstore

our local independent bookstore

Santa and Mrs Claus always appear at Time Enough on crab pot tree evening.

Santa and Mrs Claus always appear at Time Enough on crab pot tree evening.

Karla and Peter, proprietors, and Karla's sister, Kathy

Karla and Peter, proprietors, and Karla’s sister, Kathy

a bookish threesome

a bookish threesome

te3

Time Enough Books

Time Enough Books

We strolled further on to visit other port businesses.

OleBob's Café, named after two friends named Ole and Bob.

OleBob’s Café, named after two friends named Ole and Bob.

Purly Shell Fiber Arts

Purly Shell Fiber Arts has a cozy fireplace and usually two poodles assisting customers.

Purly Shell

Purly Shell

spinning wheels

spinning wheels

Just past Purly Shell and the Port Office, we visited our dear friend Don Nisbett’s art gallery.

Don Nisbett Gallery, always popular

Don Nisbett Gallery, always popular

Don's gallery has his art prints, tiles, hand painted glasses, magnets, and more.

Don’s gallery has his art prints, tiles, hand painted glasses, magnets, cards, and more.

Our great friend and Don's wife, Jenna

Our great friend and Don’s wife, Jenna (who recently had shoulder surgery)

Don and Jenna....Lower right is peach kuchen which I forgot to try!

Don and Jenna….Lower right is peach kuchen which I forgot to try!

Jenna and her elf helper

Jenna and her elf helper

Jenna says she is going to bring me some of these tomorrow.

Jenna says she is going to bring me some of these tomorrow.

Jenna also had hot chocolate and more cookies.

The gallery also offered hot chocolate and more cookies.

Further along, the new Riverszen Yoga Studio was having an open house with many treats for guests. The space is big and empty with plenty of room for yoga and stretching classes.  The building once housed the much missed Pelicano Restaurant.

river

home of Riverszen Yoga

home of Riverszen Yoga

We returned to Time Enough Books to get photos of Jenna’s elf friend with the Clauses.

clauses

Our very good friend Scout loves the bookstore's customers.

Our very good friend Scout loves the bookstore’s customers.

Scout

Scout

Karla and Scout's Santa photo

Karla and Scout’s Santa photo

Four month old puppy gets a photo, too.

Four month old puppy Ruby gets a photo, too.

Awhile early, the entire Ilwaco High School Jazz Band had had their photo taken with Santa.

photo courtesy Missy Lucy Dagger Bageant

photo courtesy Missy Lucy Dagger Bageant

The crab pot tree will stay in place and be lit in the evenings for the rest of the holiday season, so do come on down and browse Time Enough Books, say hello to Don Nisbett, buy a knitting friend some soft and colorful yarn at Purly Shell, have a late afternoon meal at Salt Pub, enjoy the view of the marina and admire the quintessentially Ilwacoan Dungeness crab pot tree.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The meander line is the border between the city and the port of Ilwaco that follows what used to be the riverbank.  I’ve tried to analyze why I am so fascinated with what is, basically, long grass, brambles, and sometimes a ditch:  When I walk it, I am able to clearly imagine it as it once was, waterfront with waves lapping up from the Columbia River.

The new and old photos of Ilwaco, below,  neatly show the meander line now and back when it was the Columbia River and Baker Bay shoreline, before the port was built. Our own place was waterfront.  The port parking lots and buildings were built on fill in the 1950s and now the water is about a block and a half from my back yard.  The two straight streets shown in the photo are Spruce Street and Lake Street, running east-west.  (West is at the top of the photo.) These aerial views demonstrate why the meander line allows for two extra short streets (Main and Eagle) intersecting with 2nd SW at the west end of town. The meander line slowly veers to the south as it goes west…allowing for those two extra streets. 

now

now

old

then

From a history of the Port of Ilwaco by Jennifer Ott:

“In 1948 the Port worked with the Army Corps of Engineers to have a new channel dredged to deep water in the river, on the west side of Sand Island. In 1951 the Port built an 1800-foot pile, timber, and stone dike to protect the moorage basin.

The River and Harbor Act of 1950 authorized the Army Corps of Engineers to build a breakwater, dredge a 20-acre moorage basin behind the breakwater, and maintain the west channel around Sand Island.

The Port agreed to provide land for the work, build access roads, improve the Port’s sewer system, and maintain public moorage facilities. The Port also provided land on which the Corps of Engineers could deposit the dredge spoils. Although the Port did not own all of the land surrounding the moorage basin, the commissioners authorized the placing of the dredge spoils along the waterfront, thereby building up all of the lots behind a seawall.

The Corps of Engineers completed their work in December 1957 and the Port served as a center for a thriving recreational boating, sport fishing, and commercial fishing and crabbing center in the 1950s and 1960s.” 

view

another aerial view

Beginning in 2012, I began to photograph the buildings and landscapes along the meander line.  In this gallery, we walk from west to east.
Thanks to Allan for going out on a cold damp day in late December to get photos to complete the gallery.
If you click to embiggen a photo, you will be rewarded with back and forth navigation arrows.

 

 

Saturday, 9 January 2016

Our good friend and sister-garden-blogger Ann Amato-Zorich came to town.  We took the opportunity to check out the very soft and mostly unadvertised opening of the pub at Salt Hotel, something we had eagerly been awaiting.  (Call 360.642.SALT for pub hours, which are variable at present.)

salt

Allan and Ann approach the courtyard

Allan and Ann approach the courtyard


Owner Julez Orr leading us to the entryway

Owner Julez Orr leading us to the entryway


view from the lower level

view from the lower level


the lower level

the lower level

Julez assured me that anyone who could not climb the stairs to the second floor bar level would be able to dine at ground level in this cozy room.

upstairs pub

upstairs pub


the view from our window table

the view from our window table

Paula Anast of Round 2 Design  did much of the interior design work for the hotel and pub.  Her description from LinkedIn:

Interior design.
stop burning piles of wood…use it!
look at the existing…imagine the future!

Specialties:Re use, Re Purpose, Re Think

Jacob Moore of Jacob’s Hammer Custom Metal Work (whose spouse is the baker for the beloved Pink Poppy Bakery) welded the tables and stools.

with Ann at a window table

with Ann at a window table


view from our table, southwest

view from our table, southwest


view from our table, southeast

view from our table, southeast


One could linger for hours with a view like this.

One could linger for hours with a view like this.


the menu

the menu


a spicy Bloody Mary

a spicy Bloody Mary


smoked tuna melt sandwiches and oyster deviled eggs

smoked tuna melt sandwiches and oyster deviled eggs…delicious.

Our dear friend Devery turned up and sat with us and ordered the stew.

pub stew

pub stew: Devery proclaimed it to be delicious.


Allan and Devery lined up to pay

Allan and Devery lined up to pay

The food portions were so ample and so reasonably priced that I found myself telling co-owner Laila that I thought the prices were too low!  Perhaps the bar tabs will enable the food prices to remain so astonishingly reasonable.

I am so pleased to see folks already sitting at the bar, and the Coast Guard jacket warms my heart because we love our coasties.  We enjoyed the ambience at Salt Pub and plan to return soon.

our Ann

our Ann

We could have lingered longer; however, Ann wanted to be back to her lodging near Naselle before dark, and she wished to purchase a crab next door at OleBob’s fish market.

at OleBob's

at OleBob’s

Ann was looking forward to cleaning the crab, which takes her back to her family childhood, and a pleasant conversation about crab-shaking (a prized skill at the local fish processing plant) ensued.

Before dusk we had time to visit Time Enough Books, just next door to OleBob’s.

Our good friend Scout greeted us.

Our good friend Scout greeted us.

There is one copy left of our friend Debbie Teashon’s excellent Gardening for the Home Brewer, and Karla has ordered more. 

 

Karla with the important reference book that I acquired.

Karla with the important reference book that I acquired.

As we were chatting about books (with Ann and I both confessing that we still need to read Robert Pyle’s Wintergreen), the subject turned to local books, and Karla realized that Ann is the daughter of  Frank Amato, who has published many of the fishing books that Karla carries in her maritime section.

a book making new friends: Karla and Ann and one of Frank Amato's books

a book making new friends: Karla and Ann and one of Frank Amato’s books

The onset of almost dusk stopped us from going further down the row of shops to Don Nisbett’s art gallery.  With just three portside places visited, we had made an afternoon of good memories.